Sorbent Products – Choosing the Right Sorbent Products For Workplace Safety

Spills are a fact of life in any industrial-type workplace. And so absorbent products like pads and rolls are an important staple in many work places. But which ones are the best ones to get? Read on and discover right sorbent products for workplace safety.

Say you’ve just finished work, you’ve got oil and grease all over your hands, and you need to wipe your hands. Without sorbent products you might be wiping your hands on concrete, the grass, or, worse — your clothes!

Of course, most businesses – especially mechanical repair shops and manufacturing warehouses- spend a lot of money on absorbent products and for good reason. And they also put some thought into getting just the right kinds.

Absorbents go a lot further than just a piece of rag or a scrap of paper towel, these days. There are specific products out there that are designed to soak up oil, anti static pads and even hazmat pads for unknown substances or substances that are known to be hazardous.

But let’s say you’re not looking for anything special, just plain absorbent pads or rolls of paper that can do the trick for a variety of cleanups around the workplace. You can have the choice of general purpose absorbents or economy absorbents in both rolls and pads.

While the general purpose ones have the benefit of being lint-free fabric, the economy ones will still absorb hydrocarbons like oil, gasoline, fuel, diesel and lubricating oils. The economy pads and rolls also have the benefit of being available for the “right price.” which makes them very popular.

But don’t overlook the general purpose versions. In addition to being made out of better material, the general purpose pads and rolls handle a broader range of fluids and oils at cleanup time. In fact, the general purpose pads will clean up all the fluids and oils the economy ones do, plus coolants, cutting fluids, hydraulic fluids, vegetable oil, acetone, turpentine, ether, MEK, hexane, trichloroethylene and more.

If you’re dealing specifically with oil then, that’s no problem either. In fact, there are absorbent pads and rolls that will repel and even float on water and, at the same time, absorb all hydrocarbons.

So now what about all of the hazardous stuff? Things like hydrochloric acid, sulfuric acid, sodium hydroxide, nitric acid and caustic soda. You need special cleanup materials for these, and the hazmat line of absorbent products is perfect for the job.

For situations that require antistatic cleanup materials, you’ll find that specially treated meltblown polypropylene is perfect for the job. The antistatic pads and rolls will absorb all oils plus any other hydrocarbons, and they also come in a blue bag for quick identification, so they won’t be confused with regular clean up materials.

The latter products are the perfect choice when it comes to absorbing fuels that may become volatile in cold applications, in dry, low humidity areas or in any place where a potential for sparks exists.

Wholesale General Merchandise – Why Online Wholesale Supplier Directories Are Vital to Your Selling

Online retailing can be a very lucrative business. Over the years this industry has grown fast and is now worth billions of dollars a year. The cost of setting-up your selling business online is but a fraction compared to traditional “brick-and-mortar” stores. However, with thousands of others having the same idea, competition can be extremely stiff. Sourcing wholesale general merchandise is a key strategy for the success of this type of business.

It used to be that buyers had to travel far and wide just to source for items at rock-bottom prices. It took a lot of time and options were somewhat limited. These days however, finding the best products and suppliers for your business is easier than ever! Anyone can now establish a bona-fide global selling business, thanks to the Internet. Suddenly, reliable and quality suppliers of goods are now just a few mouse-clicks away.

Online wholesale supplier directories give you the competitive edge. These are basically websites that lists thousands suppliers for your business. Get access to manufacturers, distributors, wholesalers, drop shippers and liquidators both locally and abroad.  This can save you valuable time and effort in finding wholesale general merchandise suppliers. The more options you have the better your chances of finding the right product, from the right supplier, at the best price.

Online wholesale supplier directories can provide you a wide-range of products to choose from. Literally tens of thousands of the latest products and goods from all over the world are available. This is vital, especially to those interested in capturing niche markets (e.g. Car, diving, or golf enthusiasts.) Start-ups will also find this diverse range of choices beneficial to establishing their product line-up.

A good online wholesale supplier directory offers buyer security, which is the best reason to use these directories for your wholesale general merchandise needs. There are as much scams, as there are authentic supplier companies out there. The best directories painstakingly verify the legitimacy of every supplier they have listed. They also provide a platform for users or members to share supplier experiences and feedback. This kind of transparency can be a lifesaver for those struggling to establish their selling business.

Specifying the Use of Surface Protection Products on Historic Interiors During Construction

Projects involving historic interiors range from the meticulous restoration of a classic movie theatre to renovations of abandoned lofts for new residences. The size of the building, significance of the interiors, and scope of work will determine how best to protect interior finishes during construction work. All work involving historic buildings, however, shares the need to properly plan for and specify appropriate temporary surface protection products. Without such provisions, unnecessary damage can result which will require additional funds and can lead to complete loss of certain interior finishes. Relying on the contractor to protect interiors without specifying such surface protection puts historic material and finishes at unnecessary risk. Protective measures must be specified in the construction specifications for the job. Although general contract language may make reference to “protecting existing construction” and may require that the contractor “restore any damage to its original condition at no additional cost” the general nature of the language affords little protection to existing historic finishes or features. Rather than provide adequate protection, some contractors deliberately elect to repair damage, believing it is cheaper. Therefore the best practice for historic interiors involves specifying protection of all historic architectural features and finishes using temporary surface protection products.

An important difference between protecting historic interior features and finishes and protecting new interior features and finishes during construction is in the timing of the construction schedule. In new work, finishes such as cabinetry and flooring are installed late in the construction schedule, after mechanical and electrical systems and other high impact work are completed, thus not exposing the finishes to major construction operations. In preservation work, however, existing interior finishes are exposed to all the high impact and potentially damaging construction phases of the project. Important architectural features which are easily removed should be stored off site, if possible, to protect them from vandalism, theft and damage during construction. Lighting fixtures, fireplace mantels, and interior doors are typical examples. Access by construction personnel to spaces with significant features and finishes should be restricted, except for their work relating directly to the preservation of such spaces. Spaces with restricted access should be identified by the planning team and indicated in the construction documents in order to allow the contractor to include any associated costs in his price proposal. For spaces such as halls and lobbies, it may not be practicable to limit access, and for all interior spaces, some construction work may be required. In such circumstances, interior finishes must be physically isolated from construction operations by means of protective barriers and coverings such as the Zipwall Systems. Such surfaces are generally limited to flooring, walls up to approximately 6 foot height, and special construction such as staircases. Flooring should be protected from damage caused by abrasion, falling objects and there are a variety of floor protection products available from companies that specialize in surface protection.

Temporary protection during construction can involve covering historic features, such as floors and walls, as well as using temporary doors to control the passage of workers and the inevitable dust and dirt. Prominently located fire extinguishers are mandatory. Where protection from spilled liquids is required, a layer of water resistant surface protection should be used. In projects where electrical systems are being upgraded the use of fire rated protection should be used. Care should be taken in choosing the appropriate floor protection to ensure that moisture from spilled liquids is not trapped against the historic flooring or that newly installed or repaired flooring can breathe. Care should also be taken to avoid coverings such as rosin paper, could potentially stain the historic flooring. Historic stairways, balustrades, balconies, fireplaces, door surrounds, window surrounds, and other components will also need to be protected from construction damage. There are a variety of surface protection products on the market including Swiftwrap handrail protection, Ram Jamb door jamb protection, DoorGuard temporary door protection and others. It makes sense to contact a surface protection expert in order to choose the best temporary protection for the project.

Specifying temporary protection of historic interiors during construction is the responsibility of both the architect and contractor. Most general conditions of a construction contract contain language such as: “The Contractor shall be solely responsible for and have control over construction means, methods, techniques, sequences and procedures and for coordinating all portions of the work. For preservation projects, it is recommended that temporary protection of historic interiors during construction be specified in a separate Division 1 specification section to ensure that required provisions are not overlooked by bidders. By creating a separate section in a price proposal, the bidder will be inclined to treat the “special project procedures” as an added cost rather than a part of the temporary facilities required for any alteration project. The contractor’s project manager can thus anticipate making reasonable expenditures for providing specified temporary surface protection during construction. To ensure the adequacy of temporary protection measures in projects involving a construction manager, temporary protection is often best provided by the construction manager, who normally works for the owner on a cost-plus-fee basis. Temporary surface protection should generally be specified as to the product name, type and company where products are available.

Conditions prior to commencement of construction should be photographically documented by the contractor. For small projects, a videotape survey may also be an effective supplement to existing conditions photographs. The owner may wish to document existing conditions independent of the contractor in order to avoid any future dispute regarding damage caused by construction operations as opposed to pre-existing damage. Temporary protection of historic interiors during construction, an essential component of any preservation project, is largely a construction management issue. A successful protection program is the result of careful pre-planning, thorough project specific specifications, owner vigilance, contract enforcement, and contractor diligence. Cost savings can be realized by minimizing damage to the historic structure in the course of construction work and the proper use of temporary surface protection products.