How to Know If Your Product Truly is Organic

Today we see the words “all natural” and “organic” thrown around quite liberally. Most countries have their own rules and regulations as to what constitutes a natural or organic product, but in general there are commonalities that most countries find acceptable.

Sadly, most people aren’t aware or even armed with the proper knowledge to determine if something truly is all natural or not. In fact, for years many soft drink companies were using high fructose corn syrup to sweeten their beverages instead of sugar. Today you will see a few companies boasting that they use “real sugar”, because it is a natural product. This is just one example of how companies love to trick consumers.

So what is the difference between an organic product and a natural one? Here are a few examples:

For organic food, the pesticides used should not be toxic, the farmers don’t harm the soil or wildlife when growing the product, and the seeds aren’t modified in any way. While there are other criteria such as soil testing and soil erosion, the examples above are the most generally accepted in many countries.

If you have ever shopped at a well known organic food store such as “Whole Foods” or similar counterparts, you will discover that many of the foods have been certified organic. Depending on what state you live in, the criteria can be very stringent or more relaxed. However, I wouldn’t recommend buying a product that claims to be organic unless it is certified.

Natural products don’t follow such stringent guidelines as organic foods, but in general are healthier alternatives to regular processed foods. Most natural foods do not contain artificial preservatives or additives and don’t receive any antibiotics or growth hormones.

Health food stores that sell all natural foods like GNC will generally test their products to make sure they follow very strict processing guidelines. However, be wary of foods on your local grocery shelves that claim to be all natural. There are numerous ways for these companies to get around the guidelines for slapping an “all natural” label on their foods.

In general, it is best to buy only organic food, but because of the expense, it is not always practical. In the end the only real way to protect yourself is through self-education and being diligent about reading product labels.

Why Contractors Need General Liability Insurance

Regardless of if you are a general contractor or a sub-contractor, contractor’s general liability insurance is one type of insurance coverage that you can not afford to do business without. Not only will the majority of jobs require your company to provide proof of GLI (general liability insurance) before allowing it on their property, but neglecting to protect your assets with this wide-ranging kind of business insurance leaves you exposed to sometimes-catastrophic liabilities if mishaps or injuries occur during a job.

Things That Contractor’s GLI Covers

Contractor’s general liability insurance coverage includes a number of vital kinds of coverages, that collectively insure bystanders, customers, sub-contractors, and employees against these kinds of claims:

* Advertising Injury (i.e., libel and slander)
* Bodily Injury
* Personal Injury
* Property Damage
* Products and Completed Operations

In every case, the contractor’s general liability coverage covers legal and judgment expenses caused by claims being filed against the insured contractor. This generally includes all the other party’s hospital expenses, earnings lost, and all pain and suffering that could have been endured.

Whereas a few of the aforementioned kinds of claims (bodily injury, personal injury, and property damage specifically) are rather common on job sites, the necessity for others might be less evident for a contractor. For this reason, it may be beneficial to review each type of claim using an example of an occurrence that can result in this type of claim being filed against a contractor.

Examples of the Types of Claims Covered

Advertising Injury

Such a claim is protected by the vast majority of contractors’ general liability policies, but it’s probably one of the rarest to actually be filed. Advertising injury is defined as damage sustained as a result of another party’s use of slander or libel against the plaintiff. If you are a contractor, one example might be a sub-contractor submitting an insurance claim against a general contractor on the premise that his professional reputation and earning potential has been weakened by damaging reviews and publicity initiated by the general contractor.

Bodily or Personal Injury

A couple of the more-common claims made against contractors, bodily injury and personal injury claims occur anytime a third party (e.g. a customer or bystander) is inadvertently injured on a job site as the result of carelessness on the part of the contractor. Personal injury claims sometimes can include psychological and emotional injury that result from either negligent or deliberate acts by the defendant. One example is a bystander who is injured by a falling step ladder which was left unattended by the contractor within an area that gets significant foot traffic.

Damage To Property

The most-prevalent claim observed on job sites, property damage claims originate from damage or loss of property because of the insured party’s activities. Such actions might be either deliberate (whereby the injured party may additionally submit a personal injury claim for psychological and emotional injury) or accidental, and are occasionally filed due to damages or injuries that happen after the contractor has already completed the project. One common illustration of this would be a plumber who is sued because water pipes he installed begin leaking and causing damage to the walls and flooring near them.

Products and Completed Services

Products and completed services insurance is very critical to contractors, because it covers the claims that occur should a client believes that a job was not done appropriately. This might be by way of a foundation that eventually splits or a wall that collapses at some point after a job has been completed.

Which Kinds of Contractor’s Should Have GLI?

Contractor’s general liability insurance is vital for any type of contractor or subcontractor because, as you’re undoubtedly aware,our culture is one wherein some people utilize lawsuits, and the threat of lawsuits, as their principal means of settling disputes. Given that a contractor’s business requires him to pass long periods of time on other people’s premises, contractors and subcontractors are open to a tremendous array of liabilities that can transform into lawsuits at a moment’s notice. As a consequence, safeguarding your business and personal assets with a comprehensive general liability policy is not only smart – it’s a necessity if your company is to survive.

Recruit Confederate Generals for Your Network Marketing Business!

“I Have a Dream” – Dr. Martin Luther King

“I Had a Dream, I Had an Awesome Dream” – Lionel Richie

“I Had an Awesome Daydream about Confederate Network Marketing” – Nathan BF Gurley

The American Civil War Between the States had ended and the top Confederate Generals were available for introduction to my new network marketing company. With the encouragement of my sponsor I was able to muster up enough moxie to approach them individually via a three way phone call. The leaders of the army were extremely receptive to my new business model and could not wait to get started. As beloved leaders in the military, they had absolutely no problem recruiting thousands of prospects to join our business. After all, it was all for the cause. My visions of never ending circles drawn on a white board were finally coming to fruition.

Suddenly, my wife instructed me to mow the lawn. Daydream over. The true screech of the Rebel Yell escaped me forever yet all is not lost. A singing cowboy rode into town with $9 and a new solution to network marketing.

The days of recruiting prospects are over. The days of elevating ordinary folks to the rank of Confederate General in the 21st Century are upon us. Before that can happen, 4 problems need to be addressed.

Problem #1: People Hate to Sell.

Many people realize the power of network marketing. Back in the day we often saw the circles on boards and flip charts in hotel conference rooms; if we were lucky enough to get a morning slot we might be able to comp an all appetizing continental breakfast. Where I come from, if it don’t have bacon, eggs, and grits, it ain’t breakfast. Anyway, most people hate to sell and you can draw all the circles you want on a chalk board – people hate to sell and that WAS a major problem.

Problem #2: People Push the Products and/or Company.

There are a few network marketing companies that have been in business since the inception of the concept; however most don’t last longer than the duration of the Civil War. The nature of the beast is that any network marketing company that hasn’t been around for numerous years lacks credibility in most peoples’ minds. A company could have the greatest product in the world and the most exciting compensation plan but so what. Most people may like the idea, but they don’t know how to market so in essence you are creating another problem in their lives i.e It’s good, I like the concept, but how am I going to market it. Doubt sets, in bills pile up, prospect drops out and the thing crashes. That WAS a major problem.

Reason #3: Most People Feel They Can’t Do Presentations.

I don’t know about you, but I sure got the jitters when I went to do a flip chart presentation.

Sometimes, the prospect would go so far as to grab the book from me to see what else was in it.

Doing product presentations WAS a major problem for most people.

Reason #4: Many People Feel They are Not Leaders.

Confederate General Lee, Jackson, Forrest & others were obviously great leaders. People like that are few and far between. More than likely most leaders are born and the others are developed. In any case, to be a leader takes passion, commitment to the cause and a holistic view of the desired outcome that needs to be achieved despite any obstacles. We all face obstacles and fail at some point or another, but most of us do not have the faith Confederate General Stonewall Jackson had. People get discouraged and drop out because they can’t visualize themselves in the place they aspire to be. Finding leaders who can direct others to become leaders WAS a major problem in network marketing.

When the Internet was first made available to the masses(15 years ago?) Network Marketers everywhere were thrilled as they would be able to reach more people. Unfortunately, for most, the dreams of success for many were never realized because the aformentioned problems still existed.

Personally, I know these problems to be self-evident because I have experienced them myself many times.

* I hate to sell

* I’ve tried to push a company or a product with no success

* I’m not a natural born learder

What do I do? Give up and allow my daydream of recruiting generals to not materialize?

NO WAY!

What say you Singing Cowboy?…

Introducing the $9 Solution

Seven years into the 21st Century a country music singer figured out how to overcome all the obstacles to success in network marketing by completely eliminating the problems mentioned earlier.

What? Are you kidding? Did Colonel Keith fill you up with too much whiskey and give your horses too much beer?

No, it’s true.

Please allow me to introduce to you Chad Rissenan, The Marketing Cowboy, inventor of the $9 Solution. The system will pole vault you over those hurdles that have been preventing you from being successful in network marketing.

No Selling, No Presenting, No bothering your family.

Follow the $9 Solution and those “circles” will come to fruition. You will develop generals in your organization who can easily teach duplication. Leaders will surface and success will follow with the $9 Solutions.

The system will:

1.) Find Prospects For You

2.) Generate Quick Cash

3.) Do Presentation for You

and much more all for the alarming price of $9.

The $9 Solution works and is revolutionizing network marketing. Try it before everyone else does.

“Get there first with the most” – Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest